Special Needs Trust

Caretakers & Parents

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A Special Needs Trust (SNT), sometimes called a Supplemental Needs Trust, is a legal arrangement in which a person or organization (like a bank) manages assets for a person with a disability. The person with the disability is called the “beneficiary” and the person who is managing the assets is the “trustee.” Many kinds of assets can be put into a trust, such as cash, stocks, bonds, and real estate. An SNT provides for the needs of a person with a disability without losing or reducing their benefits such as

Assets in an SNT won’t be counted toward the SSI, Medi-Cal and IHSS asset limit of $2000 for an individual.

Links & References

SSI #Resources & Income Limits

 

The Aged & Disabled  Medi-Cal program uses SSI countable income rules  as well as a few extra rules you should know. For more information, visit or webpage on the  SSI program, the Medi-Cal section of the Disability Benefits 101 websiteCA Health Care Advocates Archive

Countable resources are the things you own that count toward the resource limit. Many things you own do not count.

  1. Have less than $2,000 in Countable assets for an individual ($3,000 for a couple).
    1. Medi-Cal property limitations.
    2.  asset questionnaire
    3. CANHR simpler list
    4. CANHR Fact Sheet
    5. Understanding Medi-Cal’s Asset Test for Seniors and People With Disabilities
    6. Western Poverty Law 
    7. Nolo - SSI Income & Asset Limits
    8. Income SSA.Gov
      1. SSA Site
    9. Our webpage on SSI Resources & Income
  2. Have less than $1,271 - 123% of FPL  in countable monthly income for an individual ($1,719 for a couple). ca health advocates.org ADFPL    *  AB 715 Fact Sheet * Western Poverty Law  * 
    1. Share of Cost if income is too high, but you qualify on asset test?

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12 comments on “Special Needs Trust

  1. I have an Adult child that seems to be “losing it” and can’t really manage their money.

    Would a Special Needs Trust be appropriate?

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